Category Archives: Women in science

Hilda Hänchen and the Goos-Hänchen effect

Today, the United Nations declared February 11 to be the “International Day of Women and Girls in Science,” starting a new effort to get more women into science and keep them there.  In honor of this new day, I thought … Continue reading

Posted in History of science, Optics, Women in science | Leave a comment

Marguerite O’Loghlin Crowe steps from the shadows

Update: Additional images provided by Alice Zent at the end of the post! Some five years ago, I shared an intriguing anecdote from the biography of Albert A. Michelson, in which Michelson — who had a reputation of being incredibly … Continue reading

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A one-act play about a study in hiring practices in STEM

Scene: A table at Starbucks Cast: Man #1, a wealthy benefactor Man #2, an enlightened guy Man #1: Let me ask you a hypothetical question: given the choice, would you rather have world peace or a billion dollars? Man #2: Oh, … Continue reading

Posted in ... the Hell?, General science, Women in science | 1 Comment

One more anecdote about Kathleen Lonsdale

My last post hardly scratched the surface of Kathleen Lonsdale’s amazing life & career. Before moving on to other topics, I can’t help but share one more cool story about her from her biographical memoir, which incidentally is free to read … Continue reading

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Kathleen Lonsdale: Master of Crystallography

In recent years, there has been a wonderful explosion of interest in the often-neglected historical women of science, and more information is available than ever before about the lives and achievements of these women.  Nevertheless, there are still some truly … Continue reading

Posted in History of science, Women in science | 1 Comment

Jane Marcet educates Michael Faraday

This post is in honor of Ada Lovelace Day, a celebration of the contributions of women in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). Even when women weren’t officially recognized as scientists or allowed to pursue a formal education or career in science, … Continue reading

Posted in History of science, Women in science | 4 Comments

Mireya Mayor’s “Pink Boots and a Machete”

In my studies of historical figures, I’ve reserved a special spot in my heart for those people whose lived their lives, for lack of a better word, “awesomely”.   My criterion for such “awesome” people is to imagine them arriving … Continue reading

Posted in General science, Women in science | 6 Comments