Category Archives: Women in science

Jane Marcet educates Michael Faraday

This post is in honor of Ada Lovelace Day, a celebration of the contributions of women in STEM (science, technology, engineering and math). Even when women weren’t officially recognized as scientists or allowed to pursue a formal education or career in science, … Continue reading

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Posted in History of science, Women in science | 3 Comments

Mireya Mayor’s “Pink Boots and a Machete”

In my studies of historical figures, I’ve reserved a special spot in my heart for those people whose lived their lives, for lack of a better word, “awesomely”.   My criterion for such “awesome” people is to imagine them arriving … Continue reading

Posted in General science, Women in science | 6 Comments

Which scientist would you most want to have a beer with?

I’m currently away from home at a meeting, so blogging is necessarily light.  I’ve been thinking lately, however, about various scientists and people of reason throughout history that I just flat out admire, and got to wondering which of them … Continue reading

Posted in General science, Women in science | 14 Comments

Michelson and Margarite

My recent posts on Ada Lovelace Day (here and here) not only drove home the point that there were even more historically important women scientists and mathematicians than I had optimistically imagined, but that the smartest male scientists of their … Continue reading

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Some more women in science, and their appreciators

I thought, before this past week, that I appreciated quite well the important but often unacknowledged role that women have played in the history of science and mathematics.  It turns out that I’ve hardly scratched the surface of their contributions, … Continue reading

Posted in History of science, Women in science | 23 Comments

Women published in the Royal Society, 1890-1930

I’ve been struggling to think of a woman scientist to profile for Ada Lovelace Day!  Ada Lovelace (1815-1852) was a brilliant woman mathematician and arguably the first computer programmer, designing a program for Charles Babbage’s (never constructed) Analytical Engine.  Ada … Continue reading

Posted in General science, History of science, Women in science | 12 Comments