OpenLab 2009 submissions open…

I keep forgetting to note this, but submissions for The Open Laboratory 2009 are now being accepted and can be nominated at this link:

openlab-logo1

The Open Laboratory is a printed collection of the ‘best’ science blog writing of the year, and contains a lot of great entries.  Think about nominating your favorite scienceblog posts for 2009; nominations are accepted through December, I believe.  This year should be particularly excellent because it is being guest edited by the excellent blogger (and cool person) Scicurious!

Of course, if I have written/write  anything you’ve thought particularly compelling in 2009, feel free to nominate it!  I would consider nominating some of my own posts, but I’m still feeling the shame of not making the cut for the 2008 edition… 😦

P.S.  It is also interesting to note that OpenLab has inspired an anthology of a different sort: the best blog writing about roleplaying games, Open Game Table! Considering I have a history in both science and RPGs, I find the connection oddly appropriate…

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9 Responses to OpenLab 2009 submissions open…

  1. Blake Stacey says:

    Wow — OpenLab has inspired people! I’m, gosh, humbled by the extent of our influence. What’s next: an anthology of the best meta-blogging about flamewars?

    By the way, I’ve been getting comments in the “fractured ceramic” genre posted to my blog, the most recent of which have been copy-and-paste advertisements for “Super
    Relativity
    “. Their site is one big reminder of why the abstract-up-front organization of journal articles is a wonderful thing. It also illustrates rather nicely what happens when you feed somebody a garbled understanding of a couple science history items — the Michaelson-Morley experiment and the EPR test, in this case — without any context or structure or training in reasoning skills.

    (Doesn’t it seem like an awful lot of crackpot physics tries to challenge one or two classic historical experiments while being totally ignorant of the ten thousand other ways the idea in question has been checked annually ever since?)

    I’m awfully behind in my posting, and this week I’m even more thoroughly backlogged since I have to get a new computer up and running, but I thought you might find it mildly entertaining.

    • What’s next: an anthology of the best meta-blogging about flamewars?

      That would seem like a great idea except it would require an encyclopedia-sized collection each year. Heck, even if we restricted it to scientific blogging flamewars, discussions about PZ would fill an entire volume!

      (Doesn’t it seem like an awful lot of crackpot physics tries to challenge one or two classic historical experiments while being totally ignorant of the ten thousand other ways the idea in question has been checked annually ever since?)

      It kinda emphasizes the point that a good scientist isn’t just a smart person, but someone who has invested a lot of time in studying the relevant literature. I often want to reply to a lot of crackpot physics types in this manner: “That sounds like it would have been an interesting idea to pursue… about 100 years ago!!!”

      I’m awfully behind in my posting…

      Me too, me too…

  2. Blake Stacey says:

    That would seem like a great idea except it would require an encyclopedia-sized collection each year. Heck, even if we restricted it to scientific blogging flamewars, discussions about PZ would fill an entire volume!

    Which raises the next question: how many posts generated during these internecine (intranecine?) quarrels actually get read again more than a week later?

  3. I think I have collected the entire Framing Wars in one post at the time – hundreds of links!

    Thanks for the shoutout for the anthology!

  4. Wade Walker says:

    Hi gg,

    I nominated your recent post about Faraday. Hopefully my description (a snippet of which is shown below) did it justice:

    “This post tells the story of of Michael Faraday’s search for a unified theory of gravity and electromagnetism in the mid-nineteenth century. The author uses the discussion of a famous scientist’s failed experiments and unfulfilled dreams to illuminate the difficulties, both technical and psychological, of being faithful to the scientific method.”

    Thanks for all the effort you’ve put into these posts, and keep up the good work!

  5. jonathan says:

    Thanks for the bump on Open Game Table! The book is currently available via Lulu and Amazon (although Amazon keeps saying its out of stock becuase they never stock enough books from me). For all you RPG nerds out there, pick up a copy and let me know what you think. If the anthology is a success the RPG blogging community is planning a a Vol. 2 in 2010.

    • jonathan: You’re very welcome! I’m sure there are a lot of science-types like me who do/ have done double-duty as RPG fans. (In fact, I credit a lot of my number-crunching aptitude with early exposure to endless ADnD tables.)

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