Author Archives: skullsinthestars

Dead Reckonings #23 is available!

Interested in reading literary critiques of the latest horror fiction, and analyses of the same? Well, you’re in luck, because issue #23 of the Hippocampus Press literary magazine Dead Reckonings is now available! As in a number of earlier volumes, … Continue reading

Posted in Horror, Personal | Leave a comment

Dr. SkySkull in Mexico: The Great Pyramid of Cholula

A couple of weeks ago, as a part of the SPIE Visiting Lecturer program, I went and gave three talks at the Instituto Nacional de Astrofísica, Óptica y Electrónica (INAOE) in Cholula, Mexico. I had a great time, the Institute is … Continue reading

Posted in Travel | 1 Comment

RIP Emil Wolf, 1922-2018

On Saturday morning, my PhD advisor and friend Professor Emil Wolf passed away at the age of 95.  He was a singularly gifted scientist as well as an extraordinarily kind and wise person.  It is fair to say that I … Continue reading

Posted in Optics, Personal | 7 Comments

RIP Sabrina, 2006-2018

Even when you know it is coming, and soon, it is never easy to lose a animal friend.  Last night, after a six month struggle with cancer, my beloved Sabrina passed away at the age of 12. I had been … Continue reading

Posted in Animals, Personal | 19 Comments

Dr. SkySkull on WCNC!

For those who just can’t get enough of seeing me on camera (read: my parents), yesterday I did a very short spot on WCNC TV to promote UNCC’s Science and Technology Expo that is happening tomorrow, noon-4 pm, on the … Continue reading

Posted in Entertainment, Personal, Physics | 2 Comments

The Broken Earth Trilogy, by N.K. Jemisin

Let’s start with the end of the world, why don’t we? Get it over with and move on to more interesting things. So begins the beautiful, haunting, and apocalyptic Broken Earth Trilogy, written by N.K. Jemisin.  It begins with The … Continue reading

Posted in Fantasy fiction, Science fiction | 1 Comment

Arago finds new physics with a compass (1824)

One of the challenges of doing physics outreach is that there are so many cool phenomena which simply can’t be demonstrated in an eye-catching way, because they are too small, too subtle, or too complicated.  So whenever I find a … Continue reading

Posted in History of science, Physics | 1 Comment