Author Archives: skullsinthestars

My favorite “classic” horror stories

Even though I blog about horror fiction of all eras, regular readers of this blog know that I particularly love older stuff.  There’s something about the ghost and horror stories of the late 1800s and early 1900s that is particularly … Continue reading

Posted in Horror | 2 Comments

#365 papers, part 4!

I’ve joined a group of folks on Twitter who have vowed to read roughly a paper a day for an entire year, and will summarize my reading here occasionally.  Part 1 can be read here, part 2 can be read … Continue reading

Posted in Optics | Leave a comment

A.M. Burrage’s Waxwork and Other Stories

I’ve long been a fan of the work of A.M. Burrage — that little of it that I’ve been able to find, that is.  His ghost stories, originally published in six volumes from the 1920s to the 1960s, have been rarely … Continue reading

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Michael Faraday and the waterspouts (1814)

This week, one of the most fascinating/frightening videos to be posted online was of a waterspout that ran aground on a Brazilian beach, hurling debris and terrifying vacationers.  Weaker than the similar-looking tornadoes that appear over land, most waterspouts have speeds … Continue reading

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#365papers, part 3!

I’ve joined a group of folks on Twitter who have vowed to read roughly a paper a day for an entire year, and will summarize my reading here occasionally.  Part 1 can be read here, and part 2 can be … Continue reading

Posted in Optics | 1 Comment

Dr. SkySkull and the mystery of the subluminal superluminal light!

References in a scientific paper are supposed to answer questions, not raise them, but sometimes they inadvertently create a minor mystery for the reader.  A few weeks back, I blogged about the curious phenomenon of subluminal vacuum beams of light, … Continue reading

Posted in ... the Hell?, Optics | 4 Comments

Robert Aickman’s Dark Entries

It took me far longer than it should have, but I have finally read a collection of short stories by Robert Aickman (1914-1981).  Though the 1960s and 1970s, he published 48 supernatural tales, some of which are acknowledged as classics, … Continue reading

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